When Will My Baby Sleep Through the Night?

New Born Baby

“When will my baby sleep through the night?”

 

Wouldn’t it be great if there were a definitive answer to that question? There’s a reason why sleep deprivation is a utilized method of torture. Exhaustion and sleep deprivation put parents at higher risk for postpartum mood disorders, conflict in relationships, sickness, and poorer quality of life. A sleep deprived baby is at risk for negative impact to their cognitive development and their overall health. Everyone needs sleep.

 

Some babies naturally begin going to sleep and seemingly sleep through the night on their own as early as eight weeks. But, babies do not sleep through the night. Neither do adults. You wake up at night, flip over your pillow, pull the covers back when your partner has hogged them, check the time, or roll over before putting yourself back to sleep.

 

You put yourself back to sleep. During your lighter sleep cycles, you are able to transfer from one to the next without fully waking up. At some point, you learned how to.

 

Some babies don’t magically do it on their own. However, they can learn to sleep without the help of a parent or caregiver. Chances are, your baby is used to being rocked, shushed, held, nursed, bottle fed, or bounced to sleep. That is their sleep association, which is perfectly normal. This is how many newborns are soothed and able to sleep. But the newborn phase shouldn’t last forever. If you are well past the newborn phase but feel like you can’t get out of it, we can help.

 

Your baby can learn to sleep without the constant help and presence of a caregiver.

 

If your baby is three months or older and is healthy and gaining weight, they can learn to go to sleep and go back to sleep on their own between sleep cycles.

 

If being up and down all night isn’t working for you, instead of sifting through the multitude of contradictory parenting books, we can guide you in making a tailored plan to fit your baby and family’s needs. No wasted time, no needless frustration and distress. What would that look like for your family? What would you do with that time normally spent desperately willing your baby to go to sleep and stay that way? Maybe sleep. Maybe even have an adult conversation and connect with your partner again. Have individual time with your older kids. You’d have a lot more possibilities.

 

If you’re ready for sleep, you can apply for complimentary sleep assessment to see if our services are the right fit for your family. Give yourself the gift of restful nights, and your child the gift of lifelong healthy sleep habits.